Native Plants Help to Conserve our Natural Resources

Posted on: March 6th, 2020 by jhaddix

Cindy Meyer, Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District – Conservation Program Specialist

Native plants provide many benefits to us, our natural resources and local ecosystem. These benefits include but are not limited to water conservation, filtering out water pollutants, lowering maintenance requirements, and providing vital habitat for birds and many other species of wildlife.

Many folks have heard of the invasive Bush honeysuckle (other names include tartarian, Morrow’s honeysuckle and Amur honeysuckle). This plant can be found everywhere in Warren County and in many parts of Ohio and beyond. Some interesting research (Rodewald et. al.) that came out several years ago identifies this plant as a junk food of sorts for wildlife and specifically looks at the northern cardinal and the effects that honeysuckle has on the species. Birds such as cardinals (flamingos too) get their coloring from the carotenoids in the foods that they eat. In the cardinal’s case, honeysuckle berries help to promote the redness of the cardinal. In the study, honeysuckle was found to reduce the usefulness of plumage brightness as a signal of male quality for cardinals in urban forests. In other words, females were attracted to the bright red plumage of the cardinals that were sadly so-so mates.

This research gives good reason to look at natives when looking to add more plants to your landscape. There are many great plants out there and I would encourage you to check out your local nurseries to see what is available. The Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District also has their spring tree sale, which includes some native species. You can check it out at https://www.warrenswcd.com/. This sale offers small affordable trees and shrubs that can help to build your native plant collections.

One particular native that is listed in the sale catalog is spicebush or Lindera benzoin. I first became familiar with spicebush while working in northern Ohio almost two decades ago. The leaves and twigs smell spicy when they are rubbed or crushed, which lends to the plants common name, can be used to make a tea. This plant is found throughout most of the Eastern United States and is fast-growing. It enjoys moist, partially-shaded sites. Currently, there are no serious diseases or insect problems – score two-points for spicebush!

Another big plus for the shrub is that it serves as a larval host for the magnificent spicebush swallowtail, eastern tiger swallowtail and the promethea silkmoth! This plant is a perennial, deciduous shrub. It can reach up to approximately 12’ tall and has bright red berries that serve as a high energy food source for birds. This plant is dioecious, meaning male and female flowers are on separate plants and therefore a male pollinator is needed in order for the plant to set fruit on the female plant.

For information on the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District annual plant sale go to https://www.warrenswcd.com/. If you have additional questions, please contact the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation office at 513-695-1337

LATEST CORONA VIRUS INFORMATION

Posted on: March 5th, 2020 by jhaddix

For the latest information on the Corona Virus, go to www.coronavirus.ohio.gov for the most up-to-date information from the Ohio Department of Health. Below are links to download important information on the virus, including frequently asked questions, prevention, and information for community and faith-based organizations.

COVID-19 FAQs 03-02-20c
COVID-19 FAQs 03-02-20c
COVID-19_FAQs_03-02-20c.pdf
97 KiB
87 Downloads
Details
Prevention 3-02-2019   003
Prevention 3-02-2019 003
Prevention_3-02-2019___003_.pdf
2.0 MiB
37 Downloads
Details
COVID-19 CFBOs 03-02-20
COVID-19 CFBOs 03-02-20
COVID-19_CFBOs_03-02-20.pdf
1.2 MiB
27 Downloads
Details

Planning Commission Public Hearing-River Creek Lofts Preliminary Development Plan

Posted on: February 28th, 2020 by jhaddix

Village of South Lebanon

PUBLIC HEARING LEGAL NOTICE

Please be advised that a public hearing will be held by the Village of South Lebanon Planning Commission on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. at the South Lebanon Municipal Building, 10 N. High Street, South Lebanon, Ohio, 45065, to address the following issue:

River Creek Lofts, LLC (Applicant) has submitted a preliminary development plan (PDP) for the property known as 1771 Mason-Morrow-Millgrove Road, Lebanon, OH  45036 (30.54 acres, Parcel ID 12-07-326-002-0 & 12-07-100-008-0). The Applicant is proposing to create a multi-family development consisting of 416 units including one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments. Said property is currently zoned B-2 and the Applicant is requesting a change to R-3 PUD (Planned Unit Development).

Upon review and recommendation by the Planning Commission, the matter will be forwarded to the Village Council for further action.

The public record is available for inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday, at the South Lebanon Municipal Building.  Comments may also be submitted in writing to Jerry Haddix, Village Administrator, 10 North High St., South Lebanon, OH  45065 or by email at jhaddix@southlebanonohio.org.

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE! What Not To Flush!

Posted on: February 27th, 2020 by jhaddix

Surveying Crew on Mary Ellen Street & Nearby Vicinity

Posted on: February 27th, 2020 by jhaddix

It has recently come to our attention that there are platted Village streets and alleys in various locations on the east side of Mary Ellen Street from Morrow Road to King Avenue. The plat (see attached) was recorded in 1902 and the highlighted areas were never vacated and is now causing issues with transfers/sales of the affected properties.

To address this issue, the Village has contracted with McGill Smith Punshon, Inc. (MSP), a surveying company, to prepare a “Vacation Plat” which will allow the areas in question to be identified on a new plat and the property could then be transferred to the adjoining property owners.

As part of the surveying portion of this project, employees of MSP will be surveying in and around this area and will require temporary markers/stakes to be placed in the vicinity of the affected area.

We sincerely appreciate your assistance with this project. If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact me at (513) 494-2296.

Village Council-Auburn Grove Preliminary Development Plan Public Hearing

Posted on: February 7th, 2020 by jhaddix

Village of South Lebanon

PUBLIC HEARING LEGAL NOTICE

 Please be advised that a public hearing will be held by the South Lebanon Village Council on Thursday, March 12, 2020 at 6:40 p.m. at the South Lebanon Municipal Building, 10 N. High Street, South Lebanon, Ohio, 45065, to address the following issue:

Abercrombie & Associates, Inc. (Applicant) on behalf of M/I Homes of Cincinnati has submitted a preliminary development plan (PDP) for Auburn Grove on the property known as 5315 Cochran Road (19.369 acres, Parcel ID 17-36-100-025). The Applicant is proposing to create 42 single family lots on said property which is currently zoned R-3 PUD (Planned Unit Development).

The public record is available for inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday, at the Municipal Building. Comments may also be submitted in writing to Jerry Haddix, Village Administrator, 10 North High St., South Lebanon, OH  45065 or by email at jhaddix@southlebanonohio.org.

Village of South Lebanon

Jerry Haddix,

Village Administrator

Village Council-Rezoning Public Hearing-3/12/2020

Posted on: February 7th, 2020 by jhaddix

Village of South Lebanon

PUBLIC HEARING LEGAL NOTICE

 Please be advised that a public hearing will be held by the South Lebanon Village Council on Thursday, March 12, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. at the South Lebanon Municipal Building, 10 N. High Street, South Lebanon, Ohio, 45065, to address the following issue:

The purpose of the hearing is to receive public comments on an application for a zoning map amendment submitted by Thomas Megie to rezone 4.2255 acres of the property known as 5484 State Route 48 in the Village of South Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio recorded as parcel no. 1606276006 from R-1 (Single Family Residential District) to B-2 (General Business District).

The public record is available for inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday, at the Municipal Building. Comments may also be submitted in writing to Jerry Haddix, Village Administrator, 10 North High St., South Lebanon, OH  45065 or by email at jhaddix@southlebanonohio.org.

Village of South Lebanon

 Jerry Haddix,

Village Administrator

Board of Zoning Appeals Meeting – 2/27/2020

Posted on: February 7th, 2020 by jhaddix

Legal Notice

 The Village of South Lebanon Board of Zoning Appeals will hold a public hearing on  Thursday, February 27, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers located at 10 N. High Street, South Lebanon, Ohio 45065.

The purpose of the hearing is to receive public comments on an application for a variance to the Village R-3 District regulations to permit a therapy animal (pony) to be kept in the rear yard at 247 Ilene Avenue in the Village of South Lebanon.

Information about the hearing is available for review at the Village Administration Building between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed application. Comments may also be submitted in writing to Jerry Haddix, Administrator, 10 N. High Street, South Lebanon, Ohio 45065 or emailed to jhaddix@southlebanonohio.org.

Stormwater News – January, 2020

Posted on: January 29th, 2020 by jhaddix

The following article was provided by the Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District

MS4, What?

Have you ever thought about your local storm sewer system? This may be a weird question to most but it occurred to me while I was watching a cartoon with my 6 year-old son that he probably felt that our local storm sewers were a place where weird, extra large, creatures lived. And before a couple years ago, I too, did not think too much about our storm sewer system. In fact, I had no idea that our storm sewer system is called an MS4 and is a part of a permit program to help protect our local waters.

MS4 is short for, “Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System.” MS4 refers to a collection of structures designed to gather stormwater and discharge it, without treatment, into local streams and rivers. In Warren County, many of our rural developments have stormwater management structures but it is only the communities that are classified by the United States Census Bureau as “urbanized areas,” that are a part of the MS4 permit program. In total, Warren County has six MS4s.

In the State of Ohio, there are over 300 MS4s which include college campuses and hospitals. Each MS4 gets authorization from a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit (NPDES permit) to discharge stormwater into these systems. This permit is also commonly called a stormwater or MS4 permit. The word “National” refers to the connection with the Federal Clean Water Act and the word “discharge” refers to the fact that separate storm sewer systems eventually release untreated stormwater into local creeks, rivers and lakes. Each MS4 permit holder is charged with fulfilling the permit requirements but it is managed statewide by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has an oversight role because they are charged with implementing the Clean Water Act.

The MS4 permit requires communities to have six focus areas. The six focus areas are: Public Education and Outreach; Construction Site Erosion Control, Public Participation and Involvement; Post Construction Stormwater Management; Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination; Pollution Prevention and Good Housekeeping.  Each of these six focus areas have permit requirements including education and in some cases management of regulated activities. This permit work is crucial in helping keep our stormwater clean.

Some communities in Ohio do not have separate storm sewer systems and thus, are not covered under the MS4 permit program. These communities have combined storm and sanitary sewers, meaning stormwater and grey water from homes/businesses flow through the same pipe. Combined sewage systems are under different requirements federally because with increased rainfall overwhelming these systems, raw sewage ends up in our local streams and rivers, which is how these systems were designed many years ago. Many combined sewer systems are installing green infrastructure to help handle high rainfall episodes to keep sewage from overflowing into local waters. For an example of how Northeast Ohio is handling their combined sewer system, check out, https://www.neorsd.org/stormwater-2/.

In my realization of what storm sewer systems actually do, and that they do not serve as a housing system for unusually large, mutant, half human animals, I see now how important it is to protect our storm sewers and thus keep our MS4 system clean. All plants and animals must have water to survive. If there was not water there would be no life on earth. I challenge you to take part in the Imagine a Day Without Water which happens in October. You can check out ways to take part in this day at: http://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/.

If you have additional questions about your local MS4 system, contact Jerry Haddix, Village Administrator at (513) 494-2296 with your local MS4 system. For more information about stormwater, check out the Penn State Extension Stormwater Basics Series – https://extension.psu.edu/water/stormwater-management or check out the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District at https://www.warrenswcd.com/.

Short Recap

Have you ever thought about your local storm sewer system? This may be a weird question to most but it occurred to me while I was watching a cartoon with my 6 year-old son that he probably felt that our local storm sewers were at best, a place where weird, extra large, creatures lived. And before a couple years ago, I too, did not think too much about our storm sewer system. In fact, I had no idea that our storm sewer system is called an MS4 and is a part of a permit program to help protect our local waters.

Text for Social Media

Clean water is important to all living things. Did you know that the Village of South Lebanon is doing their part to help protect our stormwater and thus our local streams? www.southlebanonohio.org 

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Resources

IMPORTANT NOTICE! What NOT to flush!

Posted on: January 28th, 2020 by jhaddix

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